What are some Applications of Knowledge Sharing Cultures?

Knowledge sharing cultures can be named different things while the core business, of crafting well-functioning knowledge sharing culture, remains the same.

The following are some names to describe applications of knowledge sharing culture that have been used in this context.

  • Breaking Cycles
  • Can-do Cultures
  • High Performing Cultures
  • High Performing Teams
  • Local World Experts
  • Resilient Groups
  • Wisdom Getting

All use the same formula of TMS - trust, motivation and sharing - to advance consciously and deliberately towards self-sustaining and well-functioning knowledge sharing culture.

(Refer also to "What is a knowledge sharing culture?")

The term Breaking Cycles can be applied to both commercial and community contexts. Examples in a commercial context are: Breaking cycles of apathy in the workforce, breaking unwanted cycles (e.g. 'killing sacred cows'). Examples in a community context are: Breaking cycles of parental and social isolation, Breaking cycles of self-destruction, Breaking cycles of abuse.

The term Can Do Cultures can be applied to both commercial and community contexts. Examples in a commercial context are: 'Can do anything the best can do at … {focus of interest}'. Where focus of interest could be a technology, a design or any other area of collective endeavor.

Examples in a community context are: Can do anything the best separated parent can do.

The term Local World Expert can be applied to both commercial and community contexts. Examples in a commercial context are: Local world expert in maritime design. Examples in a community context are: Local world expert in parenting teenagers.

The term Wisdom Getting can be applied to both commercial and community contexts. Examples in a commercial context are: Wisdom getting for road design, Wisdom getting for bid development. Wisdom getting for precedent management. Examples in a community context are: Wisdom getting for part time parents, Wisdom getting to parent teenagers.

Terms help identify, and bring focus to, a common purpose. Common purpose is an essential starting ingredient in crafting well-functioning knowledge sharing cultures. As Geoff Parcell, author of Learning to Fly, observed, 'It doesn't matter where you start, what matters is that you get started.' Finding a way to just get started with whatever terms 'feel OK at the time' is better than not getting started at all.